Quelle Horreur. Image courtesy Matt Cheel.

Feminine Power and Sorronda’s Garden.

So too Sorronda’s presentation deployed a number of different genres and modalities to achieve predetermined affects that indicated a vision beyond the functionality of the garments. At this juncture it must be pointed out that since 2007 husband and business partner, Atlas Harwood, has played a major role in both production and marketing of the Gail Sorronda label. His musical acumen as bassist with the post-punk, gothic oriented, brood band Gazar Strips has been invaluable (Arcilla): so much so, that Sorronda describes their association as “interconnected”. Using a themed drama based on the Genesis story of the Garden of Eden they carefully chose the venue and the musical accompaniment to add a backdrop to the drama that would itself impart certain anticipated expectations for the attendees.

Christine Dauber. Feminine Power and Sorronda’s Garden. Read Here.

 

Robert Andrew,

Robert Andrew

Robert Andrew: Recalibrating Country.

Within the makeup of white Australian culture at this time, there was no concept of being an Urban Aboriginal. And it is this – the Urban Aboriginal – that my artwork is beginning to investigate. Primarily what it means to be labelled a Contemporary Urban Indigenous Artist whilst looking at the particular histories of Urban Aboriginals and attempting to coherently bring these stories forward toward a process of recognition, understanding and healing.

Robert Andrew: Recalibrating Country. Edited by Simon Marsh. Read Here.

 

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Carolyn Mackenzie Craig

Carolyn Mackenzie Craig: Gambit Lines.

I am particularly a print maker primarily due to its long history of distribution and subversion and it is this that formally attracted me to undertaking a teaching position within the print making department at the National Art School in Sydney. Historically print making can be seen as a practice that provides, institutes and importantly challenges acquired knowledge. And although my work extends beyond solely a print medium, it continues to arrive from a space of multiplicity, movement, disruption, distribution and an artistic criticality in defining our acquired knowledge.

Carolyn Mackenzie Craig: Through The Keyhole, Gambit Lines. Edited by Simon Marsh. Read Here.

 

Chris Worfold

Chris Worfold

Chris Worfold: The Fringe Benefit of Intention.

I think that what you’re searching for as an artist is to be able to visualise something that you know but haven’t yet seen. I know that this is a contradiction, perhaps even a paradox and yet I see it manifesting throughout all of my work, particularly in relation to the motives and motifs that repeat as they have done throughout my visual arts practice. It’s taking the familiar toward the unfamiliar in adding to the conversations that have preceded the finished object. I’ve never adhered to the conceited nature swirling around the notion of an artistic full stop, specifically with regard to the medium of painting.

Chris Worfold, The Fringe Benefit of Intention: A View of the Woods. Edited by Simon Marsh. Read Here.

 

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Dr Laini Burton

FASST 2016: Dr Laini Burton.

Motivated by the question: How might we ‘fashion’ our bodies in the future? this paper reflects on a range of examples from cosmetic surgery and extreme body modification, scientific breakthroughs such as the successful bio-fabrication of human flesh, through to the design of wearable organs hosting synthetic life. In taking this discursive approach, Dr Laini Burton presents a talk that urges us to consider the ethical, material and aesthetic aspects of (re)designing ourselves. Dr Laini Burton is a Lecturer at the Queensland College of Art, Griffith University where she convenes Studio Art and Honours within the Bachelor of Digital Media. Her research, centres on body politics, bio-art and design, fashion theory, performance and body/spatial relations. H.D Video. View Here.

 

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Dr Courtney Pedersen

FASST 2016: Dr Courtney Pedersen.

“While we often think of body modification and a ‘posthuman’ condition as being contemporary phenomena, we can look to the avant-garde art and design of the early twentieth century as predictors of many of our current concerns. In both art and fashion, there was a keen interest in redesigning the body itself as a response to technological and social change. In this talk, Dr Courtney Pedersen invites us to consider the provocations that these practitioners raised and how many of their concerns are still relevant for us today.” Dr Courtney Pedersen is the Head of Visual Arts at QUT and a Senior Lecturer in Art History / Theory. Her research interests include the position of women in art, feminist methods in creative practice-led research, and visual arts pedagogy. She has also been a practicing artist for over 20 years, with her primary training in photography at Prahran College and the VCA. H.D video. View Here.

 

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Flatline: Carl Sciberras + Todd Fuller.

The Drawing International Brisbane Symposium (D.I.B).

ran for three consecutive days from 30 September through to 2 October 2015. Comprising twelve separate, though conceptually linked exhibitions housed in commercial through to ‘not for profit’ gallery spaces with two exceptional public events and with over forty papers disseminated by local, national and international artists and art theorists, the D.I.B 2015 symposium held something of interest for all who participated. However the main thrust of this article is not to engage with an overall appraisal of the symposium but rather set a course for a balanced critical appraisal of the dynamics at play in one particular event. Under Arena was one of the lesser-seen public events. A performance art happening installed into the historic Spring Hill Reservoir, it inaugurated the symposium and was in the main a captivating example of artistic professionalism. However before descending the two and a half flights…

Simon Marsh. This Is NOT An Artefact: Drawing International Brisbane 2015. Read Here.

 

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Kathryn Brimblecombe-Fox.

Painting for Kathryn Brimblecombe-Fox is a spiritual event.

It is something that she has always done. Her work has a lyrical optimism that emanates from the beauty of the work itself and from the poetic nature of her supporting texts. Her personal oeuvre is both intelligent and understated. It comes with a big agenda – to make the world a better place in which to live. A daunting goal: but for Brimblecombe-Fox, optimism is a state of mind – a matter of choice – a way of always moving forward. This means that her painting is ethically driven, politically informed and aesthetically pleasing. Fuelled by her personal experience of a life lived in outback Queensland, the artist has focused her attentions on the land. Whilst there is a temptation to classify her oeuvre as landscape, these works do not fit easily within an idiom where scenery and gum trees define genre…

Christine Dauber (author): Kathryn Brimblecombe-Fox: Paintings 2002-2010. Read Here.

 

Dr William Platz

Dr William Platz.

Life Drawing, Yawning Zombies and the Dragan Ilic Affair: 

This paper will ruminate over a few ongoing research projects as part of a longstanding inquiry into contemporary life drawing and the transactions that occur between artists and models. It draws upon recent studio practice and an investigation of Human Canvas — a 1979 performance at Brisbane’s College of Art by artist Dragan Ilic. The studio work blends the symbolic action of yawning with tropes associated with zombie narratives. A key point of reference for this work is an obscure and sinister drawing by Edgar Degas of a young woman yawning. The study of Human Canvas focuses on the transgressions of artist/model and professional/student boundaries and the retributive aftermath of the work.

Bill Platz: Life Drawing, Yawning Zombies and the Dragan Ilic Affair. Read Here.

 

Professor Susan Best.

This talk offers a new way of thinking about the role of politically engaged art.

It examines the work of four women photographers from the southern hemisphere who are pioneering a reparative approach to art about shameful histories such as: the harsh and unjust treatment of indigenous peoples; the cruel institutionalisation of vulnerable groups; the disappearance of dissidents; and the carnage of civil war. They are: Rosângela Rennó (Brazil), Anne Ferran (Australia), Fiona Pardington (New Zealand), and Milagros de la Torre (Peru/USA). These artists make a radical break with the dominant approaches to political art (institutional critique, identity politics), which still follow the precepts of the anti-aesthetic tradition. The anti-aesthetic tradition privileges critique over aesthetic engagement, and rejects the importance of…

Sue Best. Reparative Aesthetics: Witnessing in Contemporary Art Photography. Read Here…

 

Varda Caivano, 2014, courtesy The Renaissance Society University of Chicago

Varda Caivano, detail, Untitled 2014.

What does it mean to paint today as a serious artist?

How does an artist confront and engage with the history of  painting and the much debated ‘death of painting’? After several do not resuscitates, what does a painting look like that has vitality, that is powerful, that is necessary and is critically contemporary? Caivano’s objective is to make a successful image. Success, in terms of the dynamism of the composition. Caivano’s process is to overcome the abstract challenge of making an image succeed. London based artist, Varda Caivano’s most recent exhibition at the University of Chicago’s Renaissance Society is, as put by Terry Meyers, another example of how this artist has “in productive and meaningful ways been painting versions of the same painting – her painting”.

Jonathon McWilliam. Varda Caivano: The Density of The Actions. Read Here…

 

Simon Degroot

Simon Degroot

The understanding of how to make paintings…

that are both original and reiterative of something else is present throughout the exhibition. As a PhD candidate, the depth of Degroot’s research means his work must knowingly take onboard the impossibility of undoing the Modernist monochrome. He must work ‘in direct response’ to the black monochrome, photocopying and displaying these problems in order to keep them present. And yet he must also translate these problems into new and contemporary terms – define the parameters – to propel them forward. This exhibition is an exciting achievement in Degroot’s practice. Essentially he has used his own language, created a personal lexicon in taking on the inveterate painterly, abstract conundrums of the 20th century.

Cameron Hope. Simon Degroot: Indirect Response, a Synthesis of Abstract Constructs. Read Here…

 

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Associate Professor Rex Butler

Why are certain art works popular?

Because they express something of our attitudes towards things, and thus tell us something about ourselves. There is nothing more popular in this year of the centenary of Gallipoli than Ben Quilty’s images of soldiers who have served in Afghanistan, “After Afghanistan.” But what – if we look at them closely – do they have to tell us about contemporary attitudes towards war, perhaps even despite themselves and whether we like it or not?

Rex Butler. Ben Quilty: The Fog of War. Read Here…

 

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Zoe Knight

To speak summatively, Knight’s work utilizes blocks of colour…

in her echoing of formal motifs. Roughly sphere-like knots and simple, atonal plinths, tend to be composed of one or two material components. These materials have been sourced from construction-site waste-bins, or saved for her by family and friends. Throughout her oeuvre, there is clear evidence of the hand of the artist in the works formal intricacy, tactility and precision of placement. Each of her works is a meticulously constructed, standalone piece of art that conjures intrigue whilst summoning an indefatigable interest. As each of her pieces specifically responds to their materiality and the conditions of their display, so must our means of relating to the work involve some engagement with these self same artistic triggers.

Cameron Hope. Echoes of Formal Motifs: A Show of Devotion. Read Here…

 

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Rex Butler

Art historians for some time have tried to define what “Australian” art is.

Their definitions have inevitably been exclusive, often leaving out, for example, Australian artists working overseas and artists from overseas working here. But what would it mean to say that “Australian” art can be made by anyone, anywhere? We try to answer this question by looking at a series of European artists who have painted gumtrees and a series of European and American artists who have made works called Australia and even “Aboriginal” art.

Rex Butler with A.D.S Donaldson. I Am, You Are, We Are Australia. Read Here…

 

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Franz Ehmann

referring to a silence in an artwork when everything else is screaming

is the intensity that i’m really after in certain works of my own such as the text pieces…while you can read and you can comprehend getting emotional about words…the referral to it is what i see as a dignified silence that imparts that whilst there are lines…colours and edges that amount to a small window that you have in front of you…the methodological import then becomes the ‘how’ of our response to the piece…

Franz Ehmann. The Materiality of an Artistic Existence. Read Here…

 

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Renata Buziak

When we look at the abstractions of startling photographic beauty…

Renata Buziak designates as Biochromes, we are immediately struck by thoughts of the transubstantiative atemporality of nature. This art/science endeavour embraces a distinct affect that literally jolts us from our subsumed linear elasticity and suggests altered temporalities beyond those of a cyclical transience, linear adaptability, experiences of flux, fluidity and vestigial remnants: it is an endeavour that requires a prominent reordering of the indexical nature of our observation whilst simultaneously celebrating the traditional beliefs in…

Simon Marsh. The Absolute Authority of Authenticity. Read Here…

 

Karike Ashworth

In many ways this humanistic and artistic negotiation of the…

grieving process is an expression that has and continues to blur and question the demarcation between both the public and private spheres of human expression. And yet the contemporary Western zeitgeist is seemingly configured around a sense of embarrassment toward this historic meditation on pain and loss: In lieu of connecting society with an authentic intensity of existence – living with an acute awareness of death – what we tend to witness is an elongated expectation of economic comfort, the convenience…

Simon Marsh. The Simplicity of Truth: Death Is Not the Enemy. Read Here…

 

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Carolyn V Watson

The radicalness in Watson’s work is that her process influences…

the way we view the work. The variety of materials used in her sculptures (sheep leather, bones shellac, wax) imbues them with an intuitive sense of texture. When viewing her sculptures, the internal workings reveal themselves in the form of a semi-obscured fragment of bone or a gap in the outer fabric. These glimpses into the layers beyond the surface compel us to look closer, to investigate further, while all the time wondering: “how did she do that?!” Although less conspicuous, Watson’s process is equally laborious in her two-dimensional art. She revels in traditional skills of time laboured preparation…

Jane Denison. The Physicality of Process. Read Here…

 

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Gary Carsley

Similar to the mapmakers in Jorge Luis Borges’s short story…

On Exactitude in Science found in the collection, A Universal History of Infamy, (2) Gary Carsley adheres to a cartographic exactness throughout the creation of Sciencefictive, a metaphoric mappa mundi situating the viewer at the centre of the world. The superabundance of conceptual questions that one is met with when viewing the complex series of surfaces that constitute Carsley’s most recent exhibition at the Institute of Modern Art Brisbane, seamlessly revolve around an artistic inference, circle the believability of a metaphoric significance that exists…

Simon Marsh. The Collapse of Refinement. Read Here…

 

Brendon Scott French, Tectonic Trace - Binary # 6, 2012. kiln formed glass, 1200 x 960 x 40mm.

Brendon Scott French, kiln formed glass.

The recent return of craft to the contemporary art scene is a welcome move.

This new turn sees artists working in process oriented art practices as a counter to the extravagant spectacle privileged throughout the celebrated biennale circuit. The foundling vision of JamFactory was concerned with nurturing creative talent to develop ‘a world-class crafts and design facility.’ Through its 40-year colourful history, the institution has had plenty of detractors and endured strong criticism. Thankfully, the gritty determination of the people involved has ensured its survival. As an educative and creative institution, JamFactory stands alone in Australia’s cultural history. This travelling exhibition presents an opportunity to see the latest work by some of our leading artisans. 

Jane Denison. The Disorienting Virtuosity of an Artistic Integrity. Read Here…

 

"Black Dog", readymade found object, 2013. Image courtesy Carl Warner via the artist.

“Black Dog”

To be more precise, Moore’s oscillation between the formal qualities inherent…

in fluxus, seen as the insistence of viewer participation in the completion of an artwork and notions of the dialectical opposition conceptual art set in play with regard to its unremitting institutional critique, amplified by an understanding of Nicolas Bourriaud’s relational aesthetics, amounts to an art that is about art, that is about life. This paradoxical artistic double negative, enlarged by a necessity to reveal the truth of a lived reality, can be seen as the prime mover that drives…

Simon Marsh. Who’s Afraid of Indigenous Art? Read Here…

 

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Anvil (nut cracking stone).

written on the body runs to the heart of an ongoing conundrum…

of museum ethnographic collections in that ‘while objects reflect the situation from which they are derived, they also present a distorted image of that situation even as they often come to stand for it.’[1] As highlighted in this exhibition, the early 20th century practice of labelling objects perpetuated the lacuna between the museum object and what it purports to represent. Many of the objects in this show are those sourced from the 1930s to the late 1950s when the Museum’s founder, Lindsey P. Winterbotham, amassed a considerable collection.

Jane Denison. The Divide Between the Collected and the Ordinary. Read Here…

 

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Kerry Tribe: “There Will Be________ 2012”.

Filmed in Greystone mansion, Beverly Hills, California…

from the outset we begin to formulate a sense that the overall mise en scene points toward an obscenely excessive wealth that simply lies beyond the normative conventions of culture. Tribe’s exceedingly high production values map, in a five act sequence, hypothetical’s surrounding the high society murder of Edward Doheny Jnr and his personal assistant Hugh Plunket in 1929. Whilst superficially, the installation sounds, looks, smells and feels like it ticks all the boxes of our preconceived expectations of what traditional narrative film based media is composited…

Simon Marsh. The Terminal Attrition of a Conscious Memory. Read Here…

 

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“I Feel For You 3”

A fearless and at times brutal re-imagining of the act of…

contemporary figurative painting, the artwork of Celeste Chandler unmistakably engages with the development of a new set of strategic maneuvers in her reconfiguration of a visual lexicon with which to communicate ideas. This was clearly evidenced and importantly felt in her most recent solo exhibition The Embarrassment of Sincerity: The Changing State of Contemporary Figurative Painting, shown at the Margaret Lawrence Gallery, Melbourne, from the sixth to the fifteenth of February 2014.

Simon Marsh. An Art Beyond The End of Art. Read Here…

 

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‘Pope II’

Philosopher, Alain de Botton observes ‘one of the most difficult aspects…

of renouncing religion is relinquishing ecclesiastical art and all its beauty and emotion therein.‘ In a crisis of faithlessness akin to the plight described by de Botton, Plowman tackles the papal portraits of the Renaissance and other religious icons with a conflicting blend of respect and mockery. Respect for tradition is suggested in the detailed copying of parts of the original work, and mockery arises from the artist’s changes that alter the entire tone of the original painting.

Jane Denison. Relations of Mutual Resonance. Read Here…

 

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Christian Flynn

Securing his course work masters with first class honours…

from the Queensland College of Art in 2007, Flynn has consistently been showing his seminal brand of post-modernism over the past decade. Including, though not limited to, galleries such as Soapbox, I.M.A, Ryan Renshaw, George Petelin and Ray Hughes, from the outset, his earlier efforts have clearly informed his more mature developments as an artist. This coherent commitment to exploring in depth a post-modern trajectory is in itself, testament to establishing an artistic output in an overloaded marketplace.

Simon Marsh. Christian Flynn: Power is Born Here. Read Here…

 

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“Snaith London”

There is an express denial of the contextualisation of the sitter…

in ‘real’ space. The subject is not captured in a domestic environment, or the vista of a landscape. Instead they appear as though they are an image caught in a flash of light, illuminated by a projector screen. This also facilitates the idea of the projection of perception, not only of the artist upon the subject, but the viewer upon the art. As the viewer, we are made to feel as though we are the light source. This makes the viewer conscious of their own role in the effectiveness of the artwork.

Jonathon McWilliam. Chris Inwood: Life Is. 2013 Bird Gallery. Read Here…

 

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“Watermark”

Although there is much talk in art journals of the ‘drive for equality’…

across all mediums in 21st century art, there remains a resistance towards ceramics entering the contemporary art scene. Aside from a handful of nationally recognised Australian ceramicists, such as Gwyn Hanssen Piggott, Les Blakebrough and Milton Moon, most ceramic artists do not receive recognition beyond their field. Ceramic publications frequently discuss this ongoing resistance, arguing that the use of function to divide fine art and craft is no longer valid – if indeed it has ever been.

Jane Denison. Bloom: Megan Puls. Read Here…

 

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“Dissolve”

Desire, arguably, is a fictionalized or indeed a fantastical aspiration…

and yet the hunger it engenders in the human psyche has the power to motivate actualization: the power to satiate a seemingly uncontrollable appetite to possess. It is not a one size fits all, readymade human emotion and like a cut gemstone, desire exhibits a plethora of differing facets. From the surface response of a subjective gratification, it can also scream a more sinister collective zeitgeist. Ultimately, desire has the ability to chimerically inhabit the complete spectrum of human emotional stimuli.

Simon Marsh. Intelligible Inversions of a Tired Reality? Read Here…

 

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“Collision”

Joel Rea paints epic-like visual fantasies in his new work…

at Metro Gallery in Melbourne. Intrigued by notions of chance, duality and alternate possibilities, Rea’s hyperrealist paintings delve into emotions often hidden in the depths of our private minds. Using the physical elements as a metaphor for human emotion and experience, Rea portrays nature as pulsating energy that is both majestic and threatening.

Jane Denison. Another Time, Another Place: Joel Rea. Read Here…

 

Across two decades Shahzia Sikander has revised the laborious art practice of miniature painting…

in order to investigate the relationship between collective and individual histories. Sikander was born in Pakistan in 1969 and graduated from Lahore’s National Academy of Arts in 1992.  She later moved to New York and completed a Master of Fine Arts at the Rhode Island School of Design. As a Pakistani-American woman, Sikander’s infusion of traditional iconography with contemporary motifs encourages multiple ways of looking and creates space for exploring identity.

Julia Rodwell. Shahzia Sikander. Read Here…

 

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Judy Millar

Judy Millar’s exhibition at the Institute of Modern Art (IMA), Be Do Be Do Be Do…

is physically immediate and accessible to the viewer, who is completely immersed in Millar’s artistic space. Upon entering the gallery, however, the artwork is not exclusively cognizant. This is due to Millar expressly and purposefully working against immediate cognition. The focus of this exhibition lays directly with the physical experience, the spatial language, and the communication of sensation.

Jonathon McWilliam. The Reflexive Communication of Sensation. Read here…

 

The horses and handsome men are still present in Michael Zavros’s latest exhibition, The Prince…

but this time they’re mustangs and cowboys ensconced in the American frontier. It may appear like a radical change in subject for the artist who usually favours thoroughbreds and glamour models, but The Prince sees Zavros reverting to his early artistic practice of copying found imagery. That the found imagery is Richard Prince’s iconic Cowboy series suggests that Zavros has something to add to the appropriation issue that rattled the art world.

Jane Denison. A Longing for Meaning: Michael Zavros and The Prince. Read Here…

 

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Post Modernity

This paper outlines the terms of a post-modern theory of engaging with art.

It is a theory that was taken up by the French philosopher Jean Baudrillard in his 1983/88 essay Please Follow Me. In the instance of Baudrillard and Sophie Calle (12), Sophie’s artwork continues to shadow Baudrillard. It mirrors a new meaning that is more true of Baudrillard than Baudrillard’s own insight. It is impossible for Sophie’s work to stop shadowing him as their meaning has become inextricably bound. The artist cannot exist without a follower, without an audience, without a theorist. The follower cannot theorise and impart meaning without an artwork. In this way the objective is for the follower to become the seducer. One tries to win the game, in the sense that they want the audience to win it from them. Just as the audience, in turn, seeks for it to be taken from them.

Jonathon McWilliam. Post-Modernism and the Seduction of an Unwinnable Game. Read here…

 

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Simon Marsh: Art and the Creative Industries.

However, before we get too far ahead of ourselves here…

it is an essential part of these startup communities to have access to a centralised space. With this kind of infrastructure providing studios, support and business mentoring – in effect training in what it takes to kickstart a successful niche business concept.  This coupled with commercial outlets, cinema, performance and gallery space operating under the main driver of commercialisation brings to mind a contemporary Warholian factory-like aesthetic where partnering with other sectors is openly encouraged in realising positive policy outcomes.

Simon Marsh. Monetising The Queensland Art and Creative Industry Sectors. Read Here…